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Free Camping Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains are the mountain range and the surrounding area that lie just 90 minutes from Sydney. This region is UNESCO World Heritage listed as the Greater Blue Mountains Area. It covers 1.03 million hectares and 8 protected areas. It extends north to the Hunter Valley wine area, south to Southern Highlands, and west to the ancient Jenolan Caves.

The National Park has something to offer to everyone, whether it’s a simple 5 minutes stroll, a difficult hike or the amazing views of the Jamieson Valley. We love the variety of day- and half-day hikes that traverse this region.

Is there any free camping at the Blue Mountains?

Yes, there is lots of free camping in and around the Blue Mountains. But most of the campground deep within the Blue Mountains are only accessible for tents or hikers. But no fear, there are still a few good options for caravans and camper trailers, especially if you stay closer to the main roads. We have listed our most favourite and the best rated free camping spots in this article. 

Free Camping Blue Mountains

Perrys Lookdown Campground

Perrys Lookdown is located at the National Park’s western edge and offers breathtaking views of Grose Valley, Mount Banks and Blue Gum Forest. It can be found in the Blackheath region of the Blue Mountains National Park, at the end on Hat Hill Road.

The massive sandstone cliffs that make up Mount Banks can be seen from the lookout. As you take in the stunning views, look out for yellow-tailed and wedge-tailed parrots.

It is surrounded by densely populated forests and can be reached by 2WD via bumpy roads. Only 5 campsites are located within easy reach of stunning views. This campsite offers the rare opportunity to observe the some native birds! You can also access the Blue Gum Forest’s famous and challenging walking trail.

This site is not suitable to accommodate camper trailers and caravans. This site is best suited to tent camping just a few steps from your car. However, you can also use a vehicle that has been set up as a camper.

Cost: Free ($6 booking fee)
Directions: Find on map

Acacia Flat Campground

Acacia Flat campground can be found near the Blue Gum Forest, which was saved by bushwalkers in the 1930s. You can enjoy walking among magnificent blue gums. One of these gums is over 600 years old and stands at 65m tall.

From Perry’s Lookdown Campground mentioned above, you can reach Acacia Flat Campground by walking 2km downhill. Although the facilities are not very good, there is a no flush toilet and there is a small river that can be used for swimming.

You will need to walk some distance to reach the site and then climb up when you are done. For the duration of your stay you will need to bring all the necessary items, which should fit into a backpack. This campsite might be worth a try if you haven’t been camping in a while and aren’t a regular bushwalker.

Cost: Free
Directions: Find on map

Old Ford Reserve

Old Ford Reserve is perhaps one of the most accessible campgrounds on the list. It’s only 8.5 km from Katoomba, and it’s the perfect spot for first-time campers as it is free and not far from civilisation.

Located on the grassy bank of Megalong Creek in the Megalong Valley, it is a remote camping site with sealed roads and plenty of space, so it can only be accessed by 2WD vehicles; however, 4WD driving is available down the road in the Blue Mountains National Park if you are keen for some adventure!

It is right beside the road and the well known Six Foot walking track snakes past to Jenolan Caves one way and back to Katoomba (about 8.3kms) the other. If you feel like exploring Six Foot track, you can expect to see birds, bridges, waterfalls, running creeks, and a myriad of picturesque views.

Megalong Creek often has trickling water, but it isn’t recommended for swimming or drinking.

There are firepits provided, so don’t forget to bring firewood. There are also drop toilets, picnic tables, trailer sites and bins. It’s one of the better options for caravans, RV’s and camper trailers. 

Cost: Free
Directions: Find on map

Muphys Glen Campground

Murphys Glen Campground can be found near Woodford, midway between the Blue Mountains. This campsite is perfect for a peaceful weekend getaway. It has lots of space and is very spacious. Although there are many options for bird watching and bush walking, there isn’t much water. There are a few pools nearby though. This is a great spot for a weekend getaway with your significant other or friends.

There are some pit toilets, a barbeque area, and space for camper vans and camper trailers. Be aware though, because it’s highly recommended to visit this campground with 4WD only. You can also park your tent by the paved parking lot. For the rest there are not many amenities and you’ll need to be fully self contained. 

Cost: Free ($6 booking fee)
Directions: Find on map

Cathedral Reserve Campground

Cathedral Reserve can be found on the Western Edge of Blue Mountains and is easily accessible by casual campers. The council manages it, and you can access it from Bells Line of Road. It is located just outside Mount Wilson. It’s a 10 minute walk to the Cathedral of Ferns. This is a 30-minute round trip and well worth it.

Cathedral Reserve Campground is stunning in misty weather and home to fireflies during summer nights. The area is especially beautiful in autumn, when there are many deciduous trees that display an amazing show of Autumn leaves.

There are two composting toilets on-site. The progress association recommends that campers use the open fireplaces and barbecue facilities instead of setting fires elsewhere. You will also find large parking spaces, trash bins and picnic areas. There is also tank water to wash (but boil it first), it is not suitable for drinking. This campground is accessible with caravans and RV’s.

Cost: Free
Directions: Find on map

Bilpin Reserve

The Bilpin Reserve is a rest area on the side of B59 Bells Line of Road. Campers are only allowed to camp for 24 hours max. This is great for those who arrive late in the Blue Mountains or those just passing through as it’s close to the main road. Not as nice as the other places in this article, but worth mentioning for those arriving late at night. 

Cost: Free
Directions: Find on map

Ingar Campground

Just near Wentworth Falls, Ingar campground is one of the best free Blue Mountains camping spots, especially for families. Strip off and go for a swim in the nearby dam or bring a kayak and go for a paddle down the creek. Ingar also offers quality mountain biking, so throw some bikes in the back (a great option in colder weather!).

The downside it though that Ingar Campground is not accessible by car, due to restricted access through private property. You can still get to the campground by walking or cycling the fire trail, but it’s a 10 kilometre trek. Only tents are allowed. The good news: because it’s not that accessible, it’s a beautiful and quite place to stay!

Ingar campground offers picnic tables, pit toilets, and barbeques. There are 8 unmarked campsites, and one large campsite that can cater for 20 people and 5 tents.

Cost: Free ($6 booking fee)
Directions: Find on map

Burralow Creek Campground

Burralow Creek campground is in the Lower Grose Valley, about 96km from the heart of the City. This secluded site is 4WD access only and is very popular with locals, all the sites are unmarked in an open flattish space in the middle of the bush. Great for camper trailers, vehicle campers & tents. There are not many amenities, just toilets, and some fire rings, so bring fire wood!

Cost: Free ($6 booking fee)
Directions: Find on map

Lockyer’s Track Campground

This is probably the smallest free campsite within the Blue Mountains. There is enough space to accommodate three vehicles only, and there is one toilet. It’s best suited for tents but all vehicles are allowed. Although it’s small it’s pretty close to the main road. The disadvantage is that it’s not very leveled, and there are limited amenities. There is a drop toilet, firepit and picnic table. 

Cost: Free
Directions: Find on map

Diggings Campsite

Although technically it isn’t in Blue Mountains National Park (it is located a little farther west), it’s worth mentioning here. It has 20 campsites for tent campers, vehicle campers, and camper trailers. You can bring your whole family, as it is suitable for large groups.

The Diggings campsite can be found at the mouth the Turon River. This is the ideal place to unwind and replace the urban noise with the sounds of the trees. The location is ideal for many activities such as mountain biking, hiking and trout fishing. You can also 4WD tour at the Ben Bullen trail. You will encounter a lot of wildlife, including birds, Kangaroos, and maybe even a wombat walking through the bush.

There are toilets and BBQ facilities, but not much more. Make sure you are fully self contained! 

Cost: Free ($6 booking fee)
Directions: Find on map

For more free camping in NSW, check out our complete NSW Free Camping Guide.

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